Worst Colleges in America by State

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Flint has had troubles, and Baker College is also struggling. Only 21.1% of students graduate, and when they do, they leave with $22,852 in debt. That can be pretty hard to pay off as Niche reports the median salary six years after graduation is just $27,200. 

Michigan – Baker College in Flint

This coupled with the fact that Flint has had its share of troubles, the default rate on student loans sits at 16% and on the rise. The only good news we can report is that 82% are employed two years after graduation. 

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Did you know...

  • Finland has some of the highest performing schools in the world. They often lead world rankings in education. Even so, primary school isn't compulsory until the age of seven. There are no national tests, no rankings, no inspections, and very few private schools. Finish students also report some of the highest satisfaction levels and lowest anxiety levels.
  • The oldest continually operating higher ed institution in the world is the University of al-Qarawiyyin. It was established in Fez, Morocco, in the year 859. That makes it over 1,160 years old! It was founded by a woman, Fatima al-Fihri, and became one of the leading spiritual and educational centers in the Muslim world. It joined the modern Morocco university system in 1963.
  • Where are the most-learned people in America? According to a 2019 WalletHub study, the most educated city in America was Ann Arbor, Michigan. The San Jose and Washington, D.C. metro areas followed closely behind. The least educated city, according to the study, was Visalia, California—in between Fresno and Bakersfield.
  • Teaching is a hard job, and when compared to other industrialized nations, American teacher pay is middle-of-the-pack. Maybe that’s what explains a University of Pennsylvania study that found a third of teachers quit the profession within the first 3 years. When you extend the time frame to five years, 46% leave.
  • Competition among the country's top universities is so fierce that they are forced to turn away high-performing prospective students. Harvard and Stanford, for instance, turned away a full half of their applicants who scored a perfect 1600 on the SAT. You don't have to worry about them, though. They got in elsewhere.